Jobber – Making an Enduring Impact From Day One

    Jobber | Winner of the 2018 Prairies Entrepreneur of the Year Award – Prairies

    “Start thinking about culture early. It’s not something that waits for you to define it; by the time you’re a handful of people and decide to start thinking about it, it already exists”

    Jobber is an Edmonton-based high-growth enterprise, founded by Forrest Zeisler and Sam Pillar.

    It began as a simple idea when Sam and fellow freelance software developer Forrest kept meeting inadvertently at coffee shops in 2010. After months of tinkering with the idea of creating a mobile organization ­service for businesses, Pillar and Zeisler incorporated Jobber in 2010 to help home service businesses to quote, schedule, invoice, and get paid faster. A proud Canadian SaaS company, Jobber empowers small businesses through mobile services.

    Under Forrest’s and Sam’s leadership, Jobber has raised more than nine-million-dollars in investment and has ranked as the top service software product in SoftwareAdvice.com in 2017.

    Jobber is currently in use in forty-three countries around the world. Its customers have invoiced more than 2.2 billion dollars, and it has completed  8 million jobs through the platform in a single calendar year.

    In addition, statistics show that thirty-nine percent of Jobber customers have grown their teams in 2017.

    Sam and Forrest have already made an enduring impact in the Canadian entrepreneurship landscape, and their story has just begun.

    Startup News had the opportunity to sit down with Sam Pillar to learn more.

    SN: What inspired you to become an entrepreneur?

    SP: I’ve always loved the autonomy of spending time on things that I thought were interesting and/or important. Being an entrepreneur gives you that, but it also gives you ultimate responsibility for the outcomes of your work. Balancing that autonomy/responsibility equation always seemed exciting and empowering to me, and I’m so fortunate I have the opportunity to do it.

    SN: What is the biggest lesson you have learned to date?  

    SP: People (and their motivations) are the most important part of a business. It takes real time and attention to build an organization that people want to contribute to and feel accountable for, and it can be a real competitive advantage.  

    SN: What advice do you have to those starting up today?

    SP: Start thinking about culture early. It’s not something that waits for you to define it; by the time you’re a handful of people and decide to start thinking about it, it already exists.

    SN: What is the one thing you think we need to do as a nation, today, to position Canada as a global innovation and entrepreneurial leader?

    SP: We need more homegrown companies to achieve large-scale success and in particular IPO. I believe that we also need to better protect our knowledge capital (university grads and IP) — having more successful companies (and up-and-comers) is a great way to do that.

    SN: How have you benefited from being a recipient of the Startup Canada Awards so far?

    SP: There’s been some good PR that has helped to generate interest and recognition, especially since our HQ is in Edmonton, which is out of the ordinary.